Mel's Oh's
Who gives a shit
Mel's Oh's
+
steampunksteampunk:

Horacio Casadey
http://steampunksteampunk.tumblr.com/
+
lamelohan:

when nerds lowkey call you dumb:
lamelohan:

when nerds lowkey call you dumb:
+
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
asylum-art:

Intricate Handmade Fantasy Creatures by Ellen Jewett
on Etsy | on deviantART
Born in Markham, Canada, Ellen Jewett took to shaping three-dimensional forms naturally at a young age. To Ellen, sculpting has always been about life, biological narratives and cultural statements. The tedious hours of labor act as the mysterious foundation from which each of her sculptures’ personality springs forth.
In 2007 Ellen completed her post secondary education with a degree in Biological Anthropology and Art Critique from McMaster University. She had already started Creatures from El in 2005 and upon graduation plunged into it full-time.
Ellen continues to supplement her knowledge with professional courses and apprenticeships. She aspires to pursue graduate work in anthrozoology whilst maintaining her life as a studio artist.
+
atdirmaq:

Kotori Kawashima’s stunning portraits of his young daughter are collected in his book, Mirai Chan.
atdirmaq:

Kotori Kawashima’s stunning portraits of his young daughter are collected in his book, Mirai Chan.
atdirmaq:

Kotori Kawashima’s stunning portraits of his young daughter are collected in his book, Mirai Chan.
atdirmaq:

Kotori Kawashima’s stunning portraits of his young daughter are collected in his book, Mirai Chan.
+
Boohoo.
+
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
blackrabbitsculpture:

As promised, here’s the turnaround photoset for my “Welcome to Inlé” sculpture. I’ll post some detail shots in a bit.

This project actually started way back in 2006 or so when I decided I wanted to sculpt my interpretation of the Black Rabbit of Inlé from Richard Adams’ Watership Down. I was still pretty new to sculpting, but ended up making something I was really happy with and that marked a pretty big turning point for me, both in terms of style and subject. Last summer, a couple purchased the original piece (you can find photos of it posted here on my tumblr, quite a few pages back), and paid me to create a more detailed base for the piece, and gave me free rein, creatively speaking, to do so.

The project end up taking me about nine months to complete, and the finished piece is definitely something that was a blast to work on, but also was a big challenge. I’m pleased with how it turned out, and though I miss it now that it’s in its new home, I’m glad to have it off my plate. 

It definitely won’t be the last time I explore Inlé, or the Black Rabbit himself, through sculpture, though, you can count on that. :D

Super Sculpey original/firm blend and apoxie Clay over a wire, foil, wire mesh, and wood armature, painted with cel-vinyl, mounted on a poplar board. Roughly. 25”x11”x18”

I’ll write more about the piece when I post the detail shots, which will have to be some time tomorrow, cuz I’m too sleepy to type properly now.
+
+
+
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
superkip:

So much frustration trying to post this thing!
I mean: I am Groot.
See it dance here: video.

I followed this tutorial for the most part. :)
+
xombiedirge:

 Overlook Restaurant Children’s Menu by Shane Parker